And now for something not Julie, or more work on the TR3

Wayne and I got the working on it. We took it off and it looked brand new. It says 2002 on it and I think that is the manufacture date on it. The wires leading too it were pretty roughed up, so we redid them and then took the apart.

Everything in it looked pretty good really, so we tried to spin in it off of the battery and it spun, but it was pretty slow. Neither of us really knew if it should spin fast though. We thought it should since we were really just using it at a motor instead of a generator. He ask me what I thought we should do, so I decided to mount it back up and since the car has had a dead battery a few times since I have had it, I thought we should excite it. I bought a CD of manuals for the car, but interestingly the moss motors catalog actually tells you how to do it too. So we did that and then hooked everything back up and fired the car. Lo and behold it was making about 14 volts which is way better than the 1-2 that it was doing before. So I don’t know if it was the wires or if it just needed excited again, but it is rolling good now.

The little light on the dash still isn’t ever lighting, but even when the car is idling the gauge is saying 10 volts, so maybe it is never getting low enough, or maybe a wire got pulled loose somewhere. I might try to track them down if the car is still over here when it gets a little cooler.

I don’t know if it will be here or not, with mom’s mustang messed up, she is wanting it over there pretty bad. I told her to come get it I needed to clear a spot over here to park the 56 when it gets done. 🙂

Anyway I just thought I would tell you about my latest experiment in being a mechanic.

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1 Response to And now for something not Julie, or more work on the TR3

  1. KY Dave says:

    After driving the TR3, I wanted to ask if you adjusted the tow-in?

    It seems to dart around a little and I might take it to town for adjustments at NAPA.

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